flickrlinkedin

Blogs

Latest Blogs

Training Gen-Y employees to be leaders by Nick Williams, Human Capital

For nearly a decade, the leading edge of the Millennial generation - also referred to as Gen-Y - has been making a foray in to the workplace in growing numbers. According to the recently released Deloitte Millennial Study 2014, millennials are likely to comprise 75 per cent of the global workforce by 2025. That is a significant number that simply cannot be overlooked. India is home to the largest available workforce globally - almost 70 per cent of its population being under the age of 35. Even more significant is that a large segment of this population is the Gen-Y brigade. The entry of the Millennials into the country's workforce raises important questions for organizations cutting across industries and sectors.

Research findings point to significant challenges facing business leaders if they are to meet the expectations of the Millennial generation. Even as employers focus on ways to attract and retain millennial workers, they must also prepare them for the next imminent change - guiding them into leadership roles.

Millennials want to work for organizations that foster innovative thinking, develop their skills, and make a positive contribution to society. The study also reveals that Millennials believe businesses are not currently doing as much as they could to develop their skills.

In the Deloitte CII study that looked at working and leading styles of millennials in India, the first and most striking finding is that millennials want leadership. While these younger professionals have many opportunities in front of them, they don't feel fully ready. Of current millennial leaders only 36 per cent of respondents said they felt ready when entering the role and 30 per cent still do not feel ready today, citing managing difficult people or situations, lack of experience and dealing with conflicts as their top concerns. Millennials are aware that they need leadership skills. What this means is that organizations must give young people new, exciting leadership assignments as well as the training and coaching they need. Millennials value an open, transparent, inclusive leadership style.

This generation expects more accountability more quickly in their careers and to not be suffocated by organizational layers and cumbersome structures. As organizational structures mature and become flatter (bigger/broader jobs) there is a need to review traditional growth and career paths. Organizations must find ways to harness and motivate Millenials through direct social media engagement, clear work direction, increased accountability, personalized development, more frequent and direct feedback and immediate meaningful recognition.

This generation expects more accountability more quickly in their careers and to not be suffocated by organizational layers and cumbersome structures. As organizational structures mature and become flatter (bigger/broader jobs) there is a need to review traditional growth and career paths. Organizations must find ways to harness and motivate Millenials through direct social media engagement, clear work direction, increased accountability, personalized development, more frequent and direct feedback and immediate meaningful recognition.

Nick Williams, HR Director, Tesco Hindustan Service Centre, Bangalore. He leads the Human Resource function at Tesco HSC. Nick has been with Tesco for 8 years. He started his career with the UK Graduate Program and has since held various roles in HR and Retail Operations. Nick holds a Business Bachelor's Degree and Master's Degree in HR from Aston University.